Wedding Traditions and Customs

There are many traditions and customs that are probably going to be part of your wedding whether you realise this or not, like the ones below;

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The Eternal Bond

This never-ending circle, complete union without end, is symbolised in our culture by exchanging wedding rings. It is worn on the fourth finger of the left hand, because the vein in that finger is believed to lead directly to the wearer’s heart.

Not Seeing Each Other Before the Ceremony

This came about in the days of arranged marriages to ensure the Groom wouldn’t run before he met his Bride-to-be!

The Veil

The veil is also credited to arranged marriages. To avoid the Groom backing out of the marriage, family members would ‘shield’ the bride from him until they finally met at the alter.

Something Old, Something New

The tradition of ‘something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue’ is still recognised by many brides. Something old represents the bride’s family ties and her life before marriage, while something new represents the new life she is beginning. Something borrowed represents the importance of family and friends while something blue represents the bride and groom’s faithfulness to one another.

Throwing Rice

Ancient Romans believed showering the bride and groom with rice increased their chances of having children.

There are plenty of new interpretations now including confetti and rose petals.

Carrying the Bride over the Threshold

This romantic custom is believed to have come from the time when a tribal man hit his chosen wife over the head and carried her away where her relatives couldn’t find her!

The Honeymoon

With the custom of a honeymoon a month of seclusion was said to be considered enough time for the bride’s family to call off the search for her.

Another theory is that in ancient Egypt where the bride’s father gave the groom a pot of honey in honour of their union. The ceremony always took place on a full moon, hence the word ‘honeymoon’.

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Images in this article provided by Mel Hill Photography